THE PRAYER TO PRAY BEFORE READING GOD’S WORD

Open Thou

THE PRAYER TO PRAY BEFORE READING GOD’S WORD

C.H. Spurgeon

“Open THOU mine eyes, that l may behold wondrous things out of Thy law.” [Psalm 119:18]

Some men can perceive no wonders in the gospel, but David felt sure that there were glorious things in the law: he had not half the Bible, but he prized it more than some men prize the whole. He felt that God had laid up great bounties in his word, and he begs for power to perceive, appreciate, and enjoy the same. We need not so much that God should give us more benefits, as the ability to see what he has given.

The prayer implies a conscious darkness, a dimness of spiritual vision, a powerlessness to remove that defect, and a full assurance that God can remove it. It shows also that the writer knew that there were vast treasures in the word which he had not yet fully seen, marvels which he had not yet beheld, mysteries which he had scarcely believed. The Scriptures teem with marvels; the Bible is wonder land; it not only relates miracles, but it is itself a world of wonders. Yet what are these to closed eyes? And what man can open his own eyes, since he is born blind? God himself must reveal revelation to each heart. Scripture needs opening, but not one half so much as our eyes do: the veil is not on the book, but on our hearts. What perfect precepts, what precious promises, what priceless privileges are neglected by us because we wander among them like blind men among the beauties of nature, and they are to us as a landscape shrouded in darkness!

The Psalmist had a measure of spiritual perception, or he would never have known that there were wondrous things to be seen, nor would he have prayed, “open thou mine eyes”; but what he had seen made him long for a clearer and wider sight. This longing proved the genuineness of what he possessed, for it is a test mark of the true knowledge of God that it causes its possessor to thirst for deeper knowledge.

David’s prayer in this verse is a good sequel to Psalms 119:10, which corresponds to it in position in its octave: there he said, “O let me not wander,” and who so apt to wander as a blind man? and there, too, he declared, “with my whole heart have I sought thee,” and hence the desire to see the object of his search. Very singular are the interlacings of the boughs of the huge tree of this Psalm 119, which has many wonders even within itself if we have opened eyes to mark them.

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