WHO IS A ‘SAINT’?

Mother teresa accursed

WHO IS  A ‘SAINT’?

It’s all over the news – The Pope is officially going to declare Mother Teresa a ‘saint’ tomorrow. So from now on the Roman Catholics have one more ‘holy-person’ to plead with to intercede on their behalf with God. I can already hear them chanting . . “Mother Teresa pray for us!”

I thought to myself, “What rubbish!” Paul the apostle wrote all those epistles to ‘Saints’ . . . ‘to the saints in Rome’, ‘to the saints in Ephesus’ etc . . . .WHO was he writing to? Dead Folk?!!! Well according to the Roman Catholic teaching that’s exactly who Paul must have been writing to, because according to THEM, you cannot be a saint till you’re DEAD and the Pope declares or ‘canonizes’ you as a ‘saint’!

So let us take a look at WHO or WHAT a saint is according to Scripture –

The word “saint” comes from the Greek word hagios, which means “consecrated to God, holy, sacred, pious.” It is almost always used in the plural, “saints.” “…Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much harm he did to Your saints at Jerusalem” (Acts 9:13). “Now as Peter was traveling through all those regions, he came down also to the saints who lived at Lydda” (Acts 9:32). “And this is just what I did in Jerusalem; not only did I lock up many of the saints in prisons …“ (Acts 26:10). There is only one instance of the singular use, and that is “Greet every saint in Christ Jesus…” (Philippians 4:21). In Scripture there are 67 uses of the plural “saints” compared to only one use of the singular word “saint.” Even in that one instance, a plurality of saints is in view: “…every saint…” (Philippians 4:21).

The idea of the word “saints” is a group of people set apart for the Lord and His kingdom. There are three references referring to godly character of saints: “that you receive her in the Lord in a manner worthy of the saints …” (Romans 16:2). “For the equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:12). “But immorality or any impurity or greed must not even be named among you, as is proper among saints” (Ephesians 5:3).

Therefore, scripturally speaking, the “saints” are the body of Christ, Christians, the church. All Christians are considered saints. All Christian are saints—and at the same time are called to be saints.First Corinthians 1:2states it clearly: “To the church of God in Corinth, to those sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be holy…” The words “sanctified” and �holy” come from the same Greek root as the word that is commonly translated “saints.” Christians are saints by virtue of their connection with Jesus Christ. Christians are called to be saints, to increasingly allow their daily life to more closely match their position in Christ. This is the biblical description and calling of the saints.

How does the Roman Catholic understanding of “saints” compare with the biblical teaching? Not very well. In Roman Catholic theology, the saints are in heaven. In the Bible, the saints are on earth. In Roman Catholic teaching, a person does not become a saint unless he/she is “beatified” or “canonized” by the Pope or prominent bishop. In the Bible, everyone who has received Jesus Christ by faith is a saint. In Roman Catholic practice, the saints are revered, prayed to, and in some instances, worshipped. In the Bible, saints are called to revere, worship, and pray to God alone.

[2nd paragraph and below, quoted fromgotquestions.org]

Michael Jeshurun

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