THE IDOL OF CHRISTMAS TREE

christmas-tree-worship

THE IDOL OF CHRISTMAS TREE

Michael Jeshurun

True Christians too are often snared by idols. But the promise is, that if one is a ‘true regenerated Christian’ God WILL deliver him from ALL his idols . . . “and from ALL your idols, will I cleanse you!” [Ezk 36:25]

No Christian is going to Hell because He set up a Christmas tree! But at the same time, no true Christian is going to cling to these abominable Pagan customs once he has his eyes opened to the truth behind them!

“And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now commandeth all men everywhere TO REPENT!” [Acts 17:30]
And along with the command to repent comes the grace to do so! And the mark of a nominal Christian is to KNOW THE TRUTH behind the Pagan and Roman Catholic connection of Christmas, the Christmas tree, Santa Claus and everything else that goes with this worldly celebration and CONTINUE IN IT!

For those who don’t know, here is a brief history of the darling “Christmas Tree” . . .

WHERE DOES THE CHRISTMAS TREE COME FROM?

One of the most pervasive customs of Christmas, today, is the bringing home and decorating of a “Christmas tree.” Where did this custom come from? Coffin in THE BOOK OF CHRISTMAS FOLKLORE tells us:

“Most people have heard that the Christmas tree originates in the tannenbaum and is some sort of vestige of Teutonic vegetation worship. THIS IS PARTIALLY TRUE. However, the custom of using pine and other evergreens ceremonially was well established at the ROMAN SATURNALIA, even earlier in Egypt” (p. 209).

Writes Alexander Hislop in THE TWO BABYLONS,
“The Christmas tree, now so common among us, was equally common in Pagan Rome and Pagan Egypt. In Egypt that tree was the palm tree; in Rome it was the fir; the palm tree denoting the Pagan Messiah, as Baal-Tamar, the fir referring to him as Baal-Berith. The mother of Adonis, the Sun-God and great mediatorial divinity, was mystically said to have been changed into a tree, and when in that state to have brought forth her divine son. If the mother was a tree, the son must have been recognized as the ‘Man the branch.’ And this entirely accounts for the putting of the Yule Log into the fire on Christmas Eve, and the appearance of the Christmas tree the next morning” (page 97).

Tree worship was very common among the ancients. Says Festivals, Holy Days, and Saints’ Days,

“The Christmas tree…recapitulates the idea of tree worship…gilded nuts and balls symbolizing the sun…all the festivities of the [heathen] winter solstice have been absorbed into Christmas Day…the use of holly and mistletoe to the Druidic ceremonies; the Christmas tree to the honours paid to Odin’s sacred fir….” (p. 236).

Writes Collins in Christmas Folklore:
“This idea of decorating homes on holidays is both worldwide and age-old….So the Saturnalian laurel, the Teutonic holly, the Celtic mistletoe, and the Mexican poinsettia have all attached themselves to this polyglot ceremony…

“Many of the plants used at Christmas are SYMBOLS OF FERTILITY. Certainly any evergreen (fir, yew, laurel) with its ability to return verdure in the barrens months is appropriate, but by far the most interesting are the holly, the ivy, and the mistletoe. Holly, with its pricking leaves, white flowers, and red berries symbolizes the male reproductive urge. In fact, in the English carols…the holly is the male and the ivy is the female. This use of the plants was most likely BORROWED by the Christians along with other customs of the ROMAN SATURNALIA” (p. 22-23).

Ivy, holly’s mate, in ancient Grecian rites took its name from the girl who danced with such abandon and joy before Dionysius that she fell dead at his feet. The pagan god, moved by her dance, turned her into the ivy that she might entwine whatever is near. Dionysius, of course, was the Greek version of the god of wine and revelry, another form of Bacchus, Tammuz, or Nimrod!

Mistletoe, since the earliest of times, has been regarded as mysterious and sacred, the symbol of the sun, bestower of life, an aphrodisiac, and protector against disease and poison. The plant was especially sacred to the Celtic Druids who offered it in prayer to the gods. The mistletoe was referred to by pagans as the “golden bough.” The two great holidays when the pagans gathered mistletoe were Midsummer Day, the summer solstice, and December 25, the winter solstice. It was supposed to posses the power of revealing treasures in the earth, and was formed into a “divining rod.” It was also looked upon as the “seat of life” of the sacred oak, and as an emanation of the sun’s fire. Kissing under the mistletoe is a survival of Saturnalian sexual licentiousness and bawdy immoral behavior, which was commonplace at the Saturnalia.

Still want to set up that Christmas tree?

“Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him IT IS SIN.” [James 4:17]

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