BECOMING THE MAN GOD CREATED YOU TO BE! WHAT IT MEANS TO ‘PLAY THE MAN’! 

BECOMING THE MAN GOD CREATED YOU TO BE!
WHAT IT MEANS TO ‘PLAY THE MAN’!

“Let us play the men for our people.” – [2 Samuel 10:12] 

February 23, AD 1551 Smyrna, Greece. 

Like a scene straight out of Gladiator, Polycarp was dragged into the Roman Colosseum. Discipled by the apostle John himself, the aged bishop faithfully and selflessly led the church at Smyrna through the persecution prophesied by his spiritual father. “Do not be afraid of what you are about to suffer,” writes John in Revelation 2:10. “Be faithful, even to the point of death.” John had died a half century before, but his voice still echoed in Polycarp’s ears as the Colosseum crowd chanted, “Let loose the lion!” That’s when Polycarp heard a voice from heaven that was audible above the crowd: “Be strong, Polycarp. Play the man.”

Days before, Roman bounty hunters had tracked him down. Instead of fleeing, Polycarp fed them a meal. Perhaps that’s why they granted his last request—an hour of prayer. Two hours later, many of those who heard the way Polycarp prayed actually repented of their sin on the spot. They did not, however, relent of their mission. Like Jesus entering Jerusalem, Polycarp was led into the city of Smyrna on a donkey. The Roman proconsul implored Polycarp to recant. “Swear by the genius of Caesar!” Polycarp held his tongue, held his ground. The proconsul prodded, “Swear, and I will release thee; revile the Christ!” “Eighty and six years have I served Him,” said Polycarp. “And He has done me no wrong! How then can I blaspheme my King who saved me?”

The die was cast. Polycarp was led to the center of the Colosseum where three times the proconsul announced, “Polycarp has confessed himself to be a Christian.” The bloodthirsty crowd chanted for death by beast, but the proconsul opted for fire. As his executioners seized his wrists to nail him to the stake, Polycarp stopped them. “He who gives me strength to endure the fire will enable me to do so without the help of your nails.” As the pyre was lit on fire, Polycarp prayed one last prayer: “I bless you because you have thought me worthy of this day and this hour to be numbered among your martyrs in the cup of your Christ.” Soon the flames engulfed him, but strangely they did not consume him. Like Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego before him, Polycarp was fireproof. Instead of the stench of burning flesh, the scent of frankincense wafted through the Colosseum.

Using a spear, the executioner stabbed Polycarp through the flames. Polycarp bled out, but not before the twelfth martyr of Smyrna had lived out John’s exhortation: be faithful even to the point of death. Polycarp died fearlessly and faithfully. And the way he died forever changed the way those eyewitnesses lived. He did what the voice from heaven had commanded.

Polycarp played the man.

“To ‘Play the man’ is not only to be willing to live for Jesus, but to die for Him!” – Michael Jeshurun

“Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ! No man that warreth entangleth himself with the affairs of this life; that he may please Him who hath chosen him to be a soldier!” [2Timothy 2:3,4]

[Quoted from Mark Batterson’s ‘Play the Man’ ]

Read a full excerpt – http://playtheman.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Batterson_PlayTheManExcerpt.pdf 

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3 thoughts on “BECOMING THE MAN GOD CREATED YOU TO BE! WHAT IT MEANS TO ‘PLAY THE MAN’! 

  1. The evisceration of manhood began in the fifties and has continued successfully to today. For us to “man-up” and die for His Name and sake will take the strength granted by the Holy Spirit, as was the case for Polycarp. This man walked with God daily, only hope we can say the same. Micah 6:8

    Darrel

  2. The biblical doctrine of Manhood has been insidiously undermined through the last 7 decades or so, rendering it almost beyond hope of retrieval unless it be patterned after the biblical model of Christ and His saints like Polycarp and others. More such exemplary articles need to be put out. Keep up the good work!

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